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Thread: Which Rolex should I get with an 8k budget?

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by forcabruta View Post
    You can go for a full set early 16613 (TT sub without gold-through clasp). Or a GMT master (16700 or 16710).
    I have to agree with you. Both the 16700 and 16710 are beautiful watches. But they both come with black dials. I am hoping for a blue. I'm just afraid that the 16613 would be too gaudy for me. Anyway, for the 16700/10, other than different year of production n movements, are there other differences that make one better than the other?

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    As far as know, the differences are the following:
    1) The 16700 is the last GMTm with non-independent hour hand (cal. 3175) and thus, quick-date setting (i.e. use the crown to change the date without having to turn the hour hand around and around and around).
    2) The 16700 came only in pepsi (blue/red) and black bezels. I have both! hehe. So if you want coke (red/black) your only option is the 16710.
    3) If you prefer the "no holes" case, then your only option is the 16710. (all 16700 have "holes" case).
    4) If you prefer a "SWISS MADE" dial, then your only option is the 16710. (the 16700 is mostly T<25, and a few "SWISS").
    5) The 16710 is the only one that came with cal. 3186 (vs 3185) towards the end of its production. But these go at a premium.

    Not sure if I missed something. Here is a useful site: http://www.gmtmasterhistory.com/

    Honestly, I would prefer GMTm vs TT sub any day of the week (it is a watch you can wear anywhere and with anything; classy and sporty), but if you like the blue dial, go for the 16613. The cobalt blue sunburst dial is simply amazing! And don't be concerned about what others think of your watch. Wear it for yourself, not for others
    Last edited by forcabruta; 04-11-16 at 09:40 PM.

  3. #13
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    The Yacht-Master 16622 (platinum grey dial and bezel, SS bracelet with polished center links) would also fit your budget. It is, however, a peculiar watch. Some people love it; others hate it. The grey dial is considered as dull by most, but then again it is a very subtle watch that wears with anything without showing-off. Personally I like it. And love the red seconds hand and logo on the dial. One interesting difference vs the others (GMTm and TT sub) is that it wears much larger (probably because of the thicker bezel) even though it is just 1mm larger in diameter (40mm vs 39mm). So if you have a large wrist or like big watches, it may be an interesting option.

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    Thank you for the info. I'm very impressed with your knowledge of these watches. I suppose that's what make collecting them the more interesting. I'm very new here. Thanks to this forum, now I'm swayed twds the 16710 hahaha. I hope I'll get my 1st Rolex before year end. Anyway, whats the going rate for the 16710? What are the things to look for other than the authenticity? THANKS

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    Well the most important thing to look for is the watch itself! I mean, people get fussy about box and papers etc and sometimes they forget to look at the condition of the actual watch!

    Important things that you should ask for/check:

    1) Service history known? When was the last? Rolex watches "need" to be serviced once every 5 years, at a cost of around S$1000 for an overhaul. So a recently serviced watch has a lot of added value. Not serviced does not mean you have to service it, but it may not run according to specs.
    2) Use the crown to set the time back and forth, the date, and to wind the watch; verify it pops out and sits in all 3 positions smoothly.
    3) For the GMT, rotate the bezel in both directions and feel how solid the movement is (the gears/teeth wear out eventually making the bezel turn very easily and not holding its position very well).
    4) Use your fingernail and run it around the edge of the crystal (360 degrees). A very common issue are chips around the crystal edge (from banging the watch here and there); some chips are so tiny that cannot be easily seen by the naked eye. However your nail will "catch" if it comes across a chip. Replacing the crystal will set you off S$350. But you don't have to change it if there are a few tiny chips. However knowing they are there is better than not-knowing!
    5) Observe the case: check the sides, back, and the bracelet for marks or dings or deep scratches that cannot be rescued even by polishing.
    6) Speaking of polishing, it depends on whether you like an unpolished watch (typically looks more rugged, and valued more by collectors) or a polished one (which looks more like new). Signs of polishing: coronet on the clasp is not so tall/prominent but appears smoother; bevels on lugs are not so sharp, less obvious or worse, absent (esp. in the "holes" case; they are less prominent in the "no holes" to begin with); the tiny rectangles (tiny, like 3mm by 0.5mm!) on the bottom of the lugs are not sharp and well-defined or absent (imagine them as the feet of the lugs); crown guards are not of equal size/thickness (when looking from the side).
    7) Check the dial. It should be clean from dirt, dust, or whatever else suggesting the watch was opened in the past by amateurs.
    8) Check the teeth of the case-back cover. Sharp teeth suggest the watch was never opened or at least opened with the correct tools.
    9) Check the clasp code (a 2-3 digit code next to the 5-digit bracelet code on the back of the clasp) to see if the bracelet is the original one supplied with the watch or changed at some point during its lifetime. Typically the clasp code is from the same or the next year than the watch itself (e.g. if your watch has a 1998 serial, the original clasp would be 1998 or 1999). Again, it doesn't matter if the bracelet/clasp were changed at some point. But as always, it's good to know!
    10) Original certificate is great to have (punched paper for the 16710); green tag with serial number as well. All the rest (box, booklets, calendar, holder, red tag, etc) are not specific to your watch but you can source them independently (and of the correct date) if you are peculiar about having a "full set."

    Not sure what else...

    But quite frankly, the most important thing is that you like the watch.
    Last edited by forcabruta; 04-11-16 at 11:42 PM.

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    Going rate for the 16710? Who knows, really

    I would say S$7500-8000 will get you a nice watch (with or without box) but without papers.

    An original cert will add some S$500-1000.

    Complete full sets in mint condition will set you back >9K and up to 12K!

  7. #17
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    I forgot:

    11) Count the links. Excluding end links (the small links attaching the bracelet to the head), a full bracelet has 13 links (typically). Of course you only need as many as necessary to make it fit around your wrist!
    12) Does your watch have solid end links (SEL) (center piece of the link attaching the head is not moving) or not? Non-SEL have a center piece that pivots. SEL are newer and more rigid (again, non-SEL does not mean your watch will drop off your hand

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    These are really great tips for me. I should make them into a checklist or sort so that I won't miss any point when I start to 'hunt' for one. Thanks

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    Good luck! Hope you find something you like.

  10. #20
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    Nice!!! Thanks for sharing

    Quote Originally Posted by forcabruta View Post
    Well the most important thing to look for is the watch itself! I mean, people get fussy about box and papers etc and sometimes they forget to look at the condition of the actual watch!

    Important things that you should ask for/check:

    1) Service history known? When was the last? Rolex watches "need" to be serviced once every 5 years, at a cost of around S$1000 for an overhaul. So a recently serviced watch has a lot of added value. Not serviced does not mean you have to service it, but it may not run according to specs.
    2) Use the crown to set the time back and forth, the date, and to wind the watch; verify it pops out and sits in all 3 positions smoothly.
    3) For the GMT, rotate the bezel in both directions and feel how solid the movement is (the gears/teeth wear out eventually making the bezel turn very easily and not holding its position very well).
    4) Use your fingernail and run it around the edge of the crystal (360 degrees). A very common issue are chips around the crystal edge (from banging the watch here and there); some chips are so tiny that cannot be easily seen by the naked eye. However your nail will "catch" if it comes across a chip. Replacing the crystal will set you off S$350. But you don't have to change it if there are a few tiny chips. However knowing they are there is better than not-knowing!
    5) Observe the case: check the sides, back, and the bracelet for marks or dings or deep scratches that cannot be rescued even by polishing.
    6) Speaking of polishing, it depends on whether you like an unpolished watch (typically looks more rugged, and valued more by collectors) or a polished one (which looks more like new). Signs of polishing: coronet on the clasp is not so tall/prominent but appears smoother; bevels on lugs are not so sharp, less obvious or worse, absent (esp. in the "holes" case; they are less prominent in the "no holes" to begin with); the tiny rectangles (tiny, like 3mm by 0.5mm!) on the bottom of the lugs are not sharp and well-defined or absent (imagine them as the feet of the lugs); crown guards are not of equal size/thickness (when looking from the side).
    7) Check the dial. It should be clean from dirt, dust, or whatever else suggesting the watch was opened in the past by amateurs.
    8) Check the teeth of the case-back cover. Sharp teeth suggest the watch was never opened or at least opened with the correct tools.
    9) Check the clasp code (a 2-3 digit code next to the 5-digit bracelet code on the back of the clasp) to see if the bracelet is the original one supplied with the watch or changed at some point during its lifetime. Typically the clasp code is from the same or the next year than the watch itself (e.g. if your watch has a 1998 serial, the original clasp would be 1998 or 1999). Again, it doesn't matter if the bracelet/clasp were changed at some point. But as always, it's good to know!
    10) Original certificate is great to have (punched paper for the 16710); green tag with serial number as well. All the rest (box, booklets, calendar, holder, red tag, etc) are not specific to your watch but you can source them independently (and of the correct date) if you are peculiar about having a "full set."

    Not sure what else...

    But quite frankly, the most important thing is that you like the watch.

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